The Ex-Worker #24: Communization

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#24: Communization – From the incendiary writings of The Invisible Committee prompting arrests on charges of rail line sabotage in France, to the calculated analysis of Theorie Communiste and Aufheben, we may have skipped a few things in our previous two episodes about communism. The current known as communization emerged out of the struggles of May ’68 in France, and to this day the question remains: can we enact communism ourselves, here and now? In this episode of the Ex-worker, we’ll take another angle on communism, away from the backstabbing, newspaper-hocking, withering-state-types profiled in Episodes 20 and 21, instead focusing on those who share our dream of breaking with the misery of our conditions and dismantling this world (even if they still talk like Marxists.) In this episode we experiment with different ways of breaking through some of the heavy theoretical language and ideas, including a reportback from a rather unusual Endnotes reading group, and transmit a theme segment from an autonomous, anonymous podcasting cell. We’ll travel to North and South Korea in our listener feedback section, hear an interview from Anarchist prisoner Michael Kimble about prison struggle in Alabama and the importance of supporting long-term prisoners, and round it out with news and prisoner birthdays.

You can download this and all of our previous episodes online. You can also subscribe in iTunes here or just add the feed URL to your podcast player of choice. Rate us on iTunes and let us know what you think, or send us an email to podcast@crimethinc.com. You can also call us 24 hours a day at 202–59-NOWRK, that is, 202–596–6975.

Police Poster Translated for the World Cup

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In response to the massive display of violence necessary to make the World Cup a safe zone for capitalist profiteering, our comrades in Brazil have produced a Portuguese version of our classic poster about the police. We present it here in hopes of equipping others throughout the Portuguese-speaking world to respond to the encroachments of authority. Without the servile brutality of the police, none of the social and economic inequalities of our society would be possible, nor the oppression and ecological devastation they entail. Let us delegitimize policing and stand up to police everywhere they operate.


 
      Download PDF [10MB]

This poster is also available in French and in two different German versions (one, two). We’ll publish a Spanish version here shortly.

Continue reading

Why Riot against the World Cup?

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With just a few days left before the 2014 World Cup in Brazil, we conducted an interview with our comrades in São Paulo about the demonstrations that are unfolding. In a wave of unrest emerging on the heels of last year’s riots against proposed transportation fare hikes, thousands are once again flooding the streets and clashing with police in hopes of disrupting the games. We anticipate more unrest in the coming weeks.

Read the interview.

Running from the Devil: An Interview

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In 2012, Steve Jablonski was subpoenaed to testify before a grand jury and chose instead to leave the United States. In this interview, he describes his interactions with law enforcement and his time on the run.

Download Zine PDF (online reading version). [3.1MB]

Download Imposed PDF (print-ready version). [2.1MB]

Read the Interview.

Ex-Worker #23: Paris ’68 & the Situationists

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#23: May ’68 and the Situationist International – The Ex-Worker is back! In our 23rd episode, after we catch up on how radicals around the world celebrated May Day in the streets this year, we’ll turn back the clock a few decades to a particularly notorious May: Paris in 1968. This episode focuses on the strikes and riots that nearly toppled the French state – as well as the Situationist International, those Marxist-influenced art radicals whose theories influenced the uprising. One of the key texts coming from the Situationist tradition, Raoul Vaneigem’s The Revolution of Everyday Life, appears on the Chopping Block. Listeners weigh in future episodes, “Uncle Ted,” and the Ukraine episode and anarchist strategy. And as usual, there are plenty of news, events, prisoner birthdays, and more.

You can download this and all of our previous episodes online. You can also subscribe in iTunes here or just add the feed URL to your podcast player of choice. Rate us on iTunes and let us know what you think, or send us an email to podcast@crimethinc.com. You can also call us 24 hours a day at 202–59-NOWRK, that is, 202–596–6975.

Squatting in England: Heritage & Prospects

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Over the past few years, there has been a push to criminalize squatting across Western Europe. But in a time of increasing economic instability, can governments succeed in suppressing squatting? What is at stake here?

This article reviews the background and contemporary context of squatting in England, beginning after the Second World War and comparing the current movement to its counterparts on mainland Europe. It touches on many stories: migrants squatting to build a life safe from fascist attacks, gay activists finding spaces in which to build up a scene, vibrant and insurgent squatted areas, single-issue campaigns occupying as a direct action tactic, and anti-capitalist groups setting up social centers. We hope this text will help those in present-day struggles to root themselves in the heritage of previous movements.

Full article after the jump.

The Ex-Worker #22: Ukraine

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#22: Ukraine – This week on the Ex-worker, we’re responding to a few listener requests and presenting an analysis of the situation in Ukraine, largely borrowed from our recent feature The Ukrainian Revolution and the Future of Social Movements. We’ll also hear an interview with a member of Belarus Anarchist Black Cross about repression in Belarus and Ukraine, courtesy of our comrades at A-Radio Berlin, as well as our recommendations for which insurrectionary journals you should take if you get stranded on a desert island. The episode is rounded out with news, and lots of upcoming events and prisoner birthdays.

You can download this and all of our previous episodes online. You can also subscribe in iTunes here or just add the feed URL to your podcast player of choice. Rate us on iTunes and let us know what you think, or send us an email to podcast@crimethinc.com. You can also call us 24 hours a day at 202–59-NOWRK, that is, 202–596–6975.

Steal Something from Work Day 2014

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Happy Steal Something from Work Day! Every April 15, on Tax Day, when the government robs us to pay for the police and bureaucrats who extort us, we observe Steal Something from Work Day. On this day—like every day of the year—millions of workers across the country smuggle whatever we can out of the workplace in a modest attempt to reclaim a little of the time and effort we are forced to sell. It’s a paltry substitute for the freedom we deserve, but pending revolution, we’ll take what we can get.

This year, in honor of all the workers whose stories are never told, we present the testimony of one wage slave who recalls his misspent youth in the stockroom of an upscale clothing store and recounts how he exacted his revenge, ultimately calling into question whether there is anything worth taking from the world of work at all.

More resources for the pilferous toiler:

A Theft or Work?—A grad student brings poststructuralist theory to bear on time theft, why the master’s degrees will never dismantle the master’s house, and how to resist work when it has spread so far beyond the workplace

Out Of Stock: Confessions Of A Grocery Store Guerrilla—A former Whole Foods employee recounts his efforts to run his employer out of business by means of sabotage, graffiti, and insubordination, reinterpreting William Butler Yeats’ line “The falcon cannot hear the falconer” from a bird’s-eye view.

Steal from Work to Create Autonomous Zones—The shocking true story of how a photocopy scam nearly escalated into global revolution.

And there’s more! Steal Something from Work Day videos, corporate media coverage, and even a journal (pdf, 4.3 MB).

Read this year’s account.

New Zine about Capitalism and Anxiety

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This week, our friends will be touring the Northwest to speak about the political dimensions of care and how it can perpetuate or subvert systems of oppression. Among other publications, they will be distributing a zine version of “We Are All Very Anxious: Six Theses on Anxiety and Why It is Effectively Preventing Militancy, and One Possible Strategy for Overcoming It,” a timely new text from the Institute for Precarious Consciousness in the UK discussing the affective dimensions of capitalism. We offer the zine here in printable pdf form, including a brief afterword of our own, in order that you might circulate and discuss it in your own community as well.

Download the zine.

Read the afterword.

Episode #21: Communism & Socialism, pt.2

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#21: Communism and Socialism, pt.2 – We’re back with the second installment of our exploration of anarchism’s complicated relationship with communism. Ex-worker’s Russia correspondents Misha and Anastasia come to us through the fuzzy airwaves of history, reporting live from the Russian revolution and what the anarchists are up to…. we’ll see how that goes. We’ll also hear some more feedback from everyone’s favorite gubernatorial candidate, anarchist prisoner Sean Swain, as well as extensive coverage of eco- and animal-liberation actions and prisoner rebellions from around the world.

You can download this and all of our previous episodes online. You can also subscribe in iTunes here or just add the feed URL to your podcast player of choice. Rate us on iTunes and let us know what you think, or send us an email to podcast@crimethinc.com. You can also call us 24 hours a day at 202–59-NOWRK, that is, 202–596–6975.